Events

All upcoming BioMed events

  • Please join us Thursday, April 22, at 4 p.m. for a presentation by James McPartland, PhD.

    Dr. McPartland is associate professor of child psychiatry and psychology, director of undergraduate studies, director of the Yale Developmental Disabilities Clinic and associate director of the Developmental Electrophysiology Lab at the Yale Child Study Center, and he is co-director of Team Science at the Yale Center for Clinical Investigation. Dr. McPartland’s lab investigates autism spectrum disorder from a clinical neuroscience perspective.

    Please register below to receive the Zoom link for this virtual event.

    Learn more about the Hassenfeld Institute
  • Virtual

    Pediatric Grand Rounds

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    April 23, 2021

    Speaker:

    Andrew Dauber, MD

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Chief of Endocrinology

    Children’s National Hospital

     

    Topic:

    “A Pediatric Endocrinologist’s Guide to the Genetics of Growth”

    Objectives: Participants should be able to:

    • Describe the spectrum of genetic variants that affect height
    • Differentiate between polygenic short stature and monogenic short stature
    • Recognize a few important genetic causes of short stature that affect the growth plate
    • Apply genetic testing in the work up of patients with short stature
  • Join the Moore Lab for a talk on “Crucial role for CA2 inputs in the sequential organization of CA1 time cells supporting memory” featuring Chris MacDonald, Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

    Abstract: A large body of work has shown that the hippocampus (HPC) is crucial for remembering event sequences in the context in which they were experienced. Consistent with this idea, the HPC contains time cells and place cells that together may provide a cellular basis for our ability to remember “when” and “where” past events occurred. Time and place cells share several commonalities regarding how each code for repeated experiences in spatially or temporally structured memory tasks. However, there is little known about the specific hippocampal subcircuits that generate temporal and spatial coding in support of hippocampal-dependent memories. In this talk, I will discuss recent work of mine investigating temporal and spatial coding within the dorsal hippocampal CA1 (dCA1) subregion of mice trained on a spatial working-memory task. Inhibiting dorsal hippocampal CA2 (dCA2) inputs into dCA1 disrupted the sequential organization of time cells during the memory retention period and the mouse’s subsequent memory-guided choice. Conversely, inhibiting dCA2 inputs into dCA1 had a marginal effect on the spatial organization of place cells and no effect on the mouse’s choice. Collectively, my work provides compelling evidence that spatial and temporal coding in dCA1 is largely segregated with respect to the dCA2–dCA1 circuit in support of spatial working memory and suggests that CA2 may play a critical role in representing the flow of time in memory within the hippocampal network.

  • Virtual

    BSHS Career Panel: Non-Academic Careers (Part 2)

    Location: Zoom Cost: Free
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    The Department of Behavioral and Social Science is pleased to announce the upcoming Ph.D. program Career Panel.

     

    Featuring Guest Speakers:

    Heather Cole-Lewis, Ph.D., MPH

    Director of Behavior Science, Johnson & Johnson Health and Wellness Solutions

    Cathy Lesesne, Ph.D.

    Vice President, Research Science, ICF

     

    Please note that this virtual event, including attendees’ Zoom video, audio and screen name, and questions or chats, will be recorded. All or portions of the event recording may be shared through Brown University’s digital channels. Individuals who do not want their identities to be captured are solely responsible for turning off their camera, muting their microphone and/or adjusting their screen name accordingly. By attending this event, you consent to your name, voice, and/or image being recorded and to Brown University reproducing, distributing and otherwise displaying the recording, within its sole discretion.
  • Virtual

    Seminar: Axonal dysfunction in prefrontal cortical circuits in models of ASD

    Location: Zoom Cost: Free
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    Join the Moore Lab for a talk on “Axonal dysfunction in prefrontal cortical circuits in models of ASD,” featuring John Huguenard, Ph.D., professor of neurology at Stanford University.

    Abstract

    Epilepsy and Autism Spectrum Disorders show very high comorbidity, with about a third of ASD patients experiencing epileptic seizures. What might be the common elements of circuit dysfunction that contribute to this? To begin to address this question, we have studied prefrontal cortical circuits, important nodes for executive function, in mouse ASD models. We find profound prefrontal cortical circuit hypofunction in offspring following Maternal Immune Activation. Using imaging, behavior, and electrophysiology, we demonstrate abnormal social behaviors, structural deficits in axons, especially axon initial segments, and decreased functional connectivity between deep layer prefrontal cortical neurons and their downstream targets. These studies show how chronic cortical axonal hypofunction in adulthood can result from acute maternal immune activation and point to a novel mechanism for altered executive function in ASD.

  • Join the Carney Institute for the Brain Science for its External Postdoc Seminar Series (BrainExPo), featuring Lisa Scheunemann, Ph.D., an independent research fellow at Freie Universität in Berlin.

    Abstract

    A key function of the brain is to decide which information is relevant enough to be stored as a stable memory. Pathological perturbation of this filtering process can have catastrophic consequences for later decision making. The molecular and circuit mechanisms that gate memory formation by inhibiting the storage of irrelevant information remain yet largely elusive. I have recently identified a memory suppressor mechanism in the Drosophila (fruit fly) brain within a serotonergic circuit (specifically the SPN “Serotonergic Projection Neurons”) upstream of the fly’s memory center. This “memory checkpoint” sustains a default inhibition of memory consolidation for aversive associations controlled by phosphodiesterase (PDE)-mediated suppression of neuronal activity in the SPN. Strikingly, my studies revealed that the dedicated memory checkpoint is modulated by the mating state of female flies: memory suppression by PDE is constantly inhibiting aversive memory consolidation in virgin females and is only released after mating. This mating-dependent switch is mediated by the sex peptide, a sperm-bound peptide transferred to females during copulation. Such a mechanism could promote foraging behavior in virgin females by suppression of risk-related behavior while promoting it after mating to protect the offspring. Thus, I propose that this type of memory suppression represents an important intersection between behavioral- and memory-dependent plasticity to guarantee consolidation of relevant information and context-appropriate decision making.

  • What is CRISPR? How does gene editing work? 

    Join the Carney Institute for Brain Science for a conversation about the future of gene editing in neuroscience with Kate O’Connor-Giles, Provost’s Associate Professor of Brain Science at Brown University. 

    This conversation will be moderated by Diane Lipscombe, Reliance Dhirubhai Ambani Director of the Carney Institute, and Christopher Moore, associate director of the Carney Institute.

    Watch previous conversations on the Carney Institute website.

  • Virtual

    Pathobiology Seminar: Dionna Whitney Williams, Ph.D.

    Location: Virtual event
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    Assistant Professor Dionna Williams from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine will present “But First You Must Cross the Blood Brain Barrier: Antiretroviral Therapy Access to the Brain”.  This lecture is part of the 2021 Pathobiology Graduate Program Spring Seminar Series.

  • Our featured speakers are:  James Rudolph, MD, SM
                                                 Professor, Medicine
                                                 Professor, Health Services Policy & Practice
                                                 and
                                                 Miranda Olson, MSc
                                                 Project Analyst
    Their presentation is entitled, “Rocking around the nursing home: Implementation of personalized music.
    Delivery of personalized music to nursing home residents with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias (ADRD) requires implementing a complex intervention in a unique care delivery system. Using a guiding conceptual framework, our speakers will describe variation in facility implementation via a composite adherence score.
  • The purpose of this session, which was developed by the GEA’s Medical Education Scholarship Research and Evaluation (MESRE) section, is to explore the practical application of conceptual and theoretical frameworks to education research. Social scientists and educators use relevant theories and conceptual frameworks when conducting education research. The conceptual or theoretical framework provides a lens through which to identify gaps in the literature, operationalize appropriate constructs and hypothesize relationships as well as design appropriate methodology. In addition, such frameworks can provide scholars lenses to understand how societies, organizations and people interact in certain ways.

    Despite what we know about the importance of using frameworks, educators struggle to consistently identify and incorporate them when designing their research studies, putting them at risk for negative peer review and rejection from some of the top medical education journals. This workshop will help educators understand the practical application of conceptual frameworks and how they can help situate one’s research study in the existing literature.

    Following this session participants will be able to…

    1. Describe and give examples of conceptual and theoretical frameworks commonly used in different research paradigms
    2. Examine how the selection of a framework can impact research design
    3. Discuss strategies to situate results through the lens of a conceptual or theoretical framework
    4. Identify resources that support the identification and use of conceptual frameworks

    REGISTER HERE

  • Virtual

    Pediatric Grand Rounds

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    April 30, 2021

    Speaker:

    Dean Ashish Jha, MD, MPH

    Professor of Health Services, Policy and Practice, Brown University Dean of the School of Public Health

     

    Topic:

    “Science, Communications and role of Physicians in a pandemic”

    Objectives: Participants should be able to:

    • Identify the role of information and misinformation during health crisis
    • Identify sources of disinformation and the role of physicians have in countering
    • Apply strategies physicians can use to be trusted voices for science
  • Academic May Grand Rounds

    Location: Virtual Cost: Free
    Show Details

    Academic Grand Rounds*

    The 23rd Annual David H. Barlow Oration Academic Grand Rounds*

    PTSD, Resilience, and Everything in Between: Making Sense of Outcome Heterogeneity Following Potential Trauma

    George Bonanno, Ph.D.

    Department of Counseling and Clinical Psychology

    Teachers College, Columbia University

    Wednesday, May 5, 2021 ◊ 11:00 am - 12:30 pm

  • Please join us Thursday, May 6, at 4 p.m. for a presentation by Alison Field, ScD, and Elsie Taveras, MD, MPH.

    Dr. Field is professor of epidemiology and chair of the Department of Epidemiology in the Brown University School of Public Health, professor of pediatrics with The Warren Alpert Medical School at Brown and professor of epidemiology in the Harvard School of Public Health. Dr. Field is a member of the advisory council for the Office of the Vice President for Research.

    Dr. Taveras is chief of the Division of General Academic Pediatrics and executive director of the Kraft Center for Community Health at Massachusetts General Hospital. She is also Conrad Taff Professor of Pediatrics in the Field of Nutrition at Harvard Medical School and professor in the Department of Nutrition at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

    Please register below to receive the Zoom link for this virtual event.

    Learn more about the Hassenfeld Institute
  • The Brown University “Virtual Contemplative Mentors in Residence Program” makes tradition-based contemplative practices available to students and faculty at Brown University. Our Contemplative Mentors in Residence are all skilled practitioners in their respective traditions and also PhD-level scholars who have extensive experience teaching at institutions of higher education in Asia, North America and Europe. Our mentors will teach weekly in the noon hour Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays for 10 weeks during each term of the upcoming academic year. The Summer Sessions start the week of May 10th. On Mondays, there is Thai Samatha Meditation with Sarah Shaw. On Wednesdays, there is Chinese Qigong Moving Meditation with Larson DiFiori. And on Fridays, there is Japanese Rinzai Meditation with Masaki Matsubara.


    As a Brown Faculty member, if you are interested in participating yourself, incorporating one of the practices into your syllabus, or recommending it to students to see what it’s like to develop a consistent contemplative practice, we strongly recommend – but do not require – that you sign up for the entire 10-week period this semester. If you are a Brown student, you are welcome to “shop” the first sessions during the first two weeks of May and then decide. Casual participation is also possible but not recommended. Send your decision to [email protected] with “Virtual Contemplative Mentors” in the subject line.

  • Child & Adolescent Psychiatry Grand Rounds

    Location: Virtual Cost: Free
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    Psychosocial Issues that Arise in Caring for Gender Diverse Youth and Navigation of the Rhode Island Gender Care System

    Agnieszka Janicka, M.D.

    Director, Adult Gender and Sexuality Behavioral Health Program - Lifespan

    And

    Jason Rafferty, M.D., MPH, EdM

    Pediatrician and Child Psychiatrist

    Gender & Sexuality Clinic at Hasbro Adolescent Health Center - Department of Pediatrics at Thundermist Health Centers

  • Virtual

    Pathobiology Seminar: Zelieann Craig, Ph.D.

    Location: Virtual event
    Show Details

    Associate Professor Zelieann Craig from the University of Arizona College of Medicine in Tucson will present “Human Relevant Exposures to Phthalates and Female Reproduction”.  This lecture is part of the 2021 Pathobiology Graduate Program Spring Seminar Series.

  • This workshop promotes the use of game-based learning in medical education through a framework of adult education and learning theory. Participants will experience medical education “carnival” stations to provide a solid understanding of how games can facilitate learning. Participants will have the opportunity to identify topics in their own educational practice that may lend themselves to a game-based modality.

    Following this session participants will be able to…

    1. Describe key principles of adult learning theory
    2. Engage in game based medical education modules
    3. Design a rough draft of a game applicable to their own MedEd practice

    REGISTER HERE!

  • Virtual

    BSHS Dissertation Defense | Kira Rose DiClemente, MPH

    Location: Zoom Cost: Free
    Show Details

    The Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences is pleased to announce the dissertation defense of Kira DiClemente on May 20, 2021 at 1:00 p.m. EST.

    “Mental health experiences of women exposed to war and violence in Africa: a community-based approach”

    Despite sharing a culture of resilience and strong community, African women exposed to war and violence carry a high burden of post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, and anxiety. Using a community-based approach, this dissertation examines the social context of the mental health experiences of African women exposed to war and violence. In partnership with members of the African refugee community in Providence, Rhode Island, Aims 1 and 2 of this research investigate key influences on women’s mental health, including exposure to traumatic events, sociocultural norms, and intimate partner relationships. Aim 3 presents an empirical investigation of these topics among women who remain in post-conflict settings. These findings offer novel and community-driven perspectives on intervention opportunities to address the mental health needs of this population.

     

    Please note that this virtual event, including attendees’ Zoom video, audio and screen name, and questions or chats, will be recorded. All or portions of the event recording may be shared through Brown University’s digital channels. Individuals who do not want their identities to be captured are solely responsible for turning off their camera, muting their microphone and/or adjusting their screen name accordingly. By attending this event, you consent to your name, voice, and/or image being recorded and to Brown University reproducing, distributing and otherwise displaying the recording, within its sole discretion.

  • Please join us Thursday, May 20, at 4 p.m. for a presentation by Method Tuuli, MD, MPH, MBA.

    Dr. Tuuli is the incoming chair of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology of The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University and Women and Infants Hospital of Rhode Island. Dr. Tuuli is a board-certified obstetrician-gynecologist with a sub-specialty in maternal-fetal medicine. He comes to Brown from the Indiana University School of Medicine, where he was professor, vice chair for obstetrics and director of perinatal research in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

    Please register below to receive the Zoom link for this virtual event.

    Learn more about the Hassenfeld Institute