Events

All upcoming BioMed events

  • Join the Carney Institute for Brain Science for a conversation focused on Alzheimer’s research at Brown University, featuring:

    • Stephen Salloway, Martin M. Zucker Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior at Brown, director of neurology and the Memory and Aging Program at Butler Hospital in Providence, RI
    • Ashley Webb, Richard and Edna Salomon Assistant Professor of Molecular Biology, Cell Biology and Biochemistry

    This event will be moderated by Diane Lipscombe, Reliance Dhirubhai Ambani Director of the Carney Institute, and Christopher Moore, associate director of the Carney Institute.

  • The Paul Levinger Professorship Pro Tem in the Economics of Health Care
    David R. Williams, MPH, PhD
    Florence Sprague Norman and Laura Smart Norman Professor of Public Health
    Chair, Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences
    Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

    Dr. Williams is an internationally recognized social scientist focused on social influences on health. He has been invited to keynote scientific conferences in Europe, Africa, Australia, the Middle East, South America and across the United States. His research has enhanced our understanding of the complex ways in which socioeconomic status, race, stress, racism, health behavior and religious involvement can affect health. He is the author of more than 475 scientific papers and he has served on the editorial board of 12 scientific journals and as a reviewer for over 75 others. The Everyday Discrimination Scale that he developed is the most widely used measure of discrimination in health studies.

    Registration is required. Link to Zoom webinar will be provided after registration.

    The Decoding Disparities Lecture Series

    The Decoding Disparities Lecture Series is sponsored by The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University and the Brown School of Public Health to examine health inequity and to outline steps toward a more equitable and just health care system.

    The series is supported by The Paul Levinger Professorship Pro Tem in the Economics of Health Care. This lecture was established in 1987 to honor the memory of Paul Levinger by a gift from his wife, Ruth N. Levinger, on behalf of the Levinger family. The Levingers’ daughter and son-in-law, Bette Levinger Cohen and John M. Cohen ’59, MD were instrumental in Mrs. Levinger’s decision to make this gift.

    Continuing Medical Education

    This live activity is approved for AMA PRA Category 1 Credit

    Physicians: To be eligible to claim CME credit, please register for this event at cme-learning.brown.edu

  • Virtual

    DPHB Academic Grand Rounds

    Location: Virtual Cost: Free
    Show Details

    Psychological and Developmental Impact of Trauma, Violence, and Racism: From Research to Service and Advocacy

    Maureen Allwood, Ph.D.
    Professor, Department of Psychology
    John Jay College of Criminal Justice

    City University of New York

    Wednesday, December 2, 2020 ◊ 11:00 am - 12:30 pm

    Course Link: https://cme-learning.brown.edu/DPHB-Series-2021

    Join December 2, 2020 Zoom Meeting: https://brown.zoom.us/j/97760079559

    Meeting ID: 977 6007 9559

    Password: dphb

  • XIHONG LIN

    Professor and Former Chair, Department of Biostatistics

    Coordinating Director of the Program in Quantitative Genomics at the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health

    Professor of the Department of Statistics at the Faculty of Arts and Sciences of Harvard University

    Associate Member of the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT

     

    LEARNING FROM COVID-19 DATA IN WUHAN, USA, AND THE WORLD ON TRANSMISSION, HEALTH OUTCOMES, AND INTERVENTIONS

    COVID-19 is an emerging respiratory infectious disease that has become a pandemic. In this talk, I will first provide a historical overview of the epidemic in Wuhan. I will then provide the analysis results of 32,000 lab-confirmed COVID-19 cases in Wuhan to estimate the transmission rates using Poisson Partial Differential Equation based transmission dynamic models. This model is also used to evaluate the effects of different public health interventions on controlling the COVID-19 outbreak, such as social distancing, isolation, and quarantine. I will present the results of the epidemiological characteristics of the cases. The results show that multi-faceted intervention measures successfully controlled the outbreak in Wuhan. I will next present transmission regression models for estimating transmission rates in the USA and other countries, as well as factors including intervention effects using social distancing, test-trace-isolate strategies that affect transmission rates. I will present the analysis results of >500,000 participants of the HowWeFeel project on symptoms and health conditions in the US, and discuss the risk factors of the epidemic. I will discuss the estimation of the proportion of undetected cases, including asymptomatic, pre-symptomatic cases, and mildly symptomatic cases, the chances of a resurgence in different scenarios, and the factors that affect transmissions. I will provide several takeaways and discuss priorities.

     
    Biography:

    Dr. Lin is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine . She received the 2002 Mortimer Spiegelman Award from the American Public Health Association and the 2006 Committee of Presidents of Statistical Societies (COPSS) Presidents’ Award and the 2017 COPSS FN David Award . She is an elected fellow of the American Statistical Association (ASA), Institute of Mathematical Statistics, and International Statistical Institute.

    Dr. Lin’s research interests lie in the development and application of statistical and computational methods for the analysis of massive data from the genome, exposome, and phenome, and scalable statistical inference and learning for big genomic, epidemiological, and health data. Examples include analytic methods and applications for large scale Whole Genome Sequencing studies, biobanks and electronic health records, whole-genome variant functional annotations, genes and environment, multiple phenotype analysis, risk prediction, integrative analysis of different types of data, causal mediation analysis and causal inference, analysis of epidemiological and complex observational study data. Her theoretical and computational statistical research includes statistical methods for testing a large number of complex hypotheses, causal inference, statistical inference for large covariance matrices, prediction models using high-dimensional data, cloud-based statistical computing, and statistical methods for epidemiological studies.

    Dr. Lin’s statistical methodological research has been supported by the MERIT Award (R37) (2007-2015) and the Outstanding Investigator Award (OIA) (R35) (2015-2022) from the National Cancer Institute (NCI). She is the contact PI of the Harvard Analysis Center of the Genome Sequencing Program of the National Human Genome Research Institute , and the multiple PI of the U19 grant on Integrative Analysis of Lung Cancer Etiology and Risk from NCI. She is also the contact PI of the T32 training grant on interdisciplinary training in statistical genetics and computational biology . She is the former contact PI of the Program Project (PO1) on Statistical Informatics in Cancer Research from NCI.

    Dr. Lin is the former Chair of the COPSS (2010-2012) and a former member of the Committee of Applied and Theoretical Statistics (CATS) of the National Academy of Science. She co-launched the new Section of Statistical Genetics and Genomics of the American Statistical Association and served as a former section chair. She is the former Coordinating Editor of Biometrics and the founding co-editor of Statistics in Biosciences. She has served on a large number of committees of many statistical societies, and numerous NIH and NSF review panels.

  • Regina Binda is inviting you to a scheduled Zoom meeting.

    Topic: Aging & Dementia Research Presentation
    Time: Dec 2, 2020 01:00 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)

    Join Zoom Meeting
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    Meeting ID: 948 4008 6825
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    Aging and Dementia Research Presentation

     Sponsored by: The Norman Prince Neurosciences Institute

    In Association with:

    The Rhode Island Hospital Alzheimer’s Disease & Memory Disorders Center

     “Pupil Measurement as a Novel,

    Non-Invasive Biomarker of Risk for Alzheimer’s Disease”

     Laura Korthauer, PhD

    Assistant Professor

    Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior

     December 2, 2020

    1 to 2 PM

    Via Zoom

  • Join Virtual Event Code: Zoom link will be sent upon registration.

    Please join us on Wednesday, December 2nd at 1 PM EST for a presentation with Co-Founder and CEO of Sproutel, Aaron Horowitz: “Designing With Empathy: Creating a Companion for Children With Cancer.” Sproutel leverages a unique patient-centered design process to create products hand-in-hand with patients. This talk will focus on sharing the story of designing My Special Aflac Duck, a social robot for children with cancer, providing the audience with insight into how to collaborate with patients to design products and the key advantages to this approach.

    *When: Wed. December 2nd @ 1 PM EST

    *Location: Zoom Meeting

    *RSVP here - after registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

    Aaron Horowitz is a maker; from sculptures to business, he is fascinated with the process of taking an idea from concept to reality. His experience growing up with human growth hormone deficiency inspired a desire to bring empathy, design, and a patient-centered mindset to healthcare. He is the co-founder and CEO of Sproutel, a research and development workshop focused on creating play-based healthcare innovations. Sproutel is best known for their work creating Jerry the Bear, a best friend for children with type 1 diabetes, and My Special Aflac Duck, a robotic companion for children with cancer. The White House and Barack Obama recognized Sproutel as one of 32 companies representing diversity in tech in 2015, and Aaron as one of 50 honored makers in 2014. He holds a degree in Mechatronics and User Interaction Design from Northwestern University, a major he created to pursue a passion for understanding how people play with robots! Through his work, Aaron is on a mission to design technology with purpose. When unplugged Aaron is likely either carving stone or surfing.

  • BRENDEN LAKE

    Assistant Professor of Psychology and Data Science, NYU

    LEARNING THROUGH THE EYES OF A CHILD

    Young children have meaningful expectations about the world around them. What is the origin of this early knowledge? How much can be explained through generic learning mechanisms applied to sensory data, and how much requires more substantive innate inductive biases? Addressing this fundamental question in its full generality is infeasible, but we can hope to make real progress in more narrowly defined domains, such as the development of high-level visual categories, thanks to new datasets and progress in deep learning. We train large-scale neural networks through the eyes of a single developing child, using longitudinal baby headcam videos (Sullivan et al., 2020, PsyArxiv). Our results show how high-level visual representations emerge from a subset of one baby’s experience, through only self-supervised learning.

     
    Biography

    Brenden builds computational models of everyday cognitive abilities, focusing on problems that are easier for people than they are for machines. The human mind is the best-known solution to a diverse array of difficult computational problems: learning new concepts, learning new tasks, understanding scenes, learning a language, asking questions, forming explanations, amongst many others. Machines also struggle to simulate other facets of human intelligence, including creativity, curiosity, self-assessment, and commonsense reasoning.

    In this broad space of computational challenges, Brenden’s work has addressed a range of questions: How do people learn a new concept from just one or a few examples? How do people act creatively when designing new concepts? How do people learn qualitatively different forms of structure? How do people ask questions when searching for information?

    By studying these distinctively human endeavors, there is potential to advance both cognitive science and machine learning. In cognitive science, building a computational model is a test of understanding; if people outperform all existing algorithms on certain types of problems, we have more to understand about how people solve them. In machine learning, these cognitive abilities are both important open problems as well as opportunities to reverse engineer human solutions. By studying human solutions to difficult computational problems, Brenden aims to better understand humans and to build machines that learn in more powerful and more human-like ways.

     

    Follow Brenden on Twitter: @LakeBrenden

     

    DSI & CCMB Data Wednesday Seminar Series

    The Data Science Initiative (DSI) joins the Center for Computational and Molecular Biology (CCMB ) every Wednesday afternoon, 4 – 5 pm during the academic year to present lecturers in various mathematical and statistical fields worldwide, as well as local researchers on Brown’s campus. The aim is to provide students, staff, faculty, and visitors with an introduction to current research topics in the fields of data science, mathematics, statistics, and computer science. Please check our events page for more information on these and other events of interest.

  • Virtual

    CCBS Seminar Series: Geometry of Object Representation in Visual Hierarchies

    Location: Zoom Cost: Free
    Show Details

    “Geometry of Object Representation in Visual Hierarchies”

    Haim Sompolinsky, Ph.D.
    The Hebrew University  

    Abstract: Neurons in object representations in top stages of the visual hierarchy exhibit high selectivity to object identity as well as to identity-preserving variables, including location, orientation and scale. suggesting that changes in the object representations from low to high processing stages are related to changes in the geometry of object manifolds. Each manifold consists of the set of population responses to stimuli belonging to the same object.

    In my talk, I will present recent work that elucidates the relation between manifold geometry and object-identity computations. I will discuss two kinds of computations. The first is object classification. I will describe new measures of manifold radius and dimensions that predict the ability to support object classification (Chung et al., PRX, 2018). Based on these measures, we characterize the changes in manifold geometry as signals propagate across layers of Deep Convolutional Neural Networks (DCNNs). Recordings from neurons in various stages of the visual systems, have been similarly analyzed, allowing us to test the correspondence between DCNNs and the visual hierarchy in the visual cortex.

    In a recent unpublished work with Ben Sorscher (Stanford), we have studied the ability to learn new objects and object categories from just a few examples (the few shot learning problem). We show that feature layers in DCNNs exhibit a remarkable ability in few shot learning of new categories. To explain this performance, we develop a new theory of the geometry of concept formation, that delineates the salient geometric features that underlie rapid concept formation in artificial and brain sensory hierarchies.

  • Virtual

    Pediatric Grand Rounds

    Show Details

    December 4, 2020

     

    Speaker :

     

    Nicole Alexander Scott, MD

    Director, Rhode Island Department of Health

     

    Topic :

    “COVID-19 in Children in Rhode Island”

     

    Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, participants should be able to:

     

    • Indicate Rhode Island’s strategic response to the COVID-19 pandemic.
    • Define the impact of COVID-19 to different age groups, especially children.
    • Identify the disproportionate impact COVID-19 has on different communities in Rhode Island
    • Recognize statewide efforts to return students to school safely, while establishing a robust K-12 testing program.
  • Please join us for our monthly (virtual) Division of Global Emergency Medicine Educational Conference held the first Friday of every month from 11:00 AM - 12:30 PM.

    This conference is a great learning opportunity for those with an interest in global health, public health, emergency medicine, humanitarian and disaster response. All are welcome.

    Included in the program will be a global emergency medicine Journal Club by our division fellows, faculty didactic presentation, as well as “Global EM Bedside Rounds” clinical case presentation by division chair Dr. Adam Levine.

    Email our GEM coordinator and intern Suraya Ortiz [email protected] for the ZOOM link to join. We look forward to having you join our next conference!

  • Virtual

    A Conversation with Dr. Valerie Montgomery Rice

    Show Details

    Please Join Dr. Ashish K. Jha, dean of the Brown University School of Public Health, for a conversation with Valerie Montgomery Rice, MD, FACOG, president and dean of Morehouse School of Medicine.

    Valerie Montgomery Rice, MD, FACOG, provides a valuable combination of experience at the highest levels of patient care and medical research, as well as organizational management and public health policy. Marrying her transformational leadership acumen and strategic thinking to tackle challenging management issues, she has a track record of redesigning complex organizations’ infrastructures to reflect the needs of evolving strategic environments and position the organization for success through sustainability tactics.

    The sixth president of Morehouse School of Medicine (MSM) and the first woman to lead the free-standing medical institution, Montgomery Rice serves as both the president and dean. A renowned infertility specialist and researcher, she most recently served as dean and executive vice president of MSM, where she has served since 2011.

    An interactive audience Q&A will follow.

    Registration for this webinar is limited and on a first come first serve basis.

  • Virtual

    Child & Adolescent Psychiatry Grand Rounds*

    Location: Virtual Cost: Free
    Show Details

    The Diagnosis and Treatment of Tourette Syndrome

    Barbara J. Coffey, MD, MS

    Professor and Chair, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    University of Miami

    Miller School of Medicine Wednesday, December 9, 2020 ◊ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

    Course Link: https://cme-learning.brown.edu/Child-Adolescent-2021

    Join December 9, 2020 Zoom Meeting: https://brown.zoom.us/j/99914605173
    Meeting ID: 999 1460 5173

    Password: dphb

  • Virtual

    Hebrew Senior Life-Brown Joint Seminar Series

    Show Details

    Our guest speakers for this lecture are A. Lynn Snow, PhD, University of Alabama & Tuscaloosa VA Medical Center and Christine W. Hartmann, PhD, University of Massachusetts Lowell & VA Center for Healthcare Organization & Implementation Research

    Drs. Snow and Hartmann will introduce the LOCK sleep program for nursing home residents living with dementia and the series of studies through which LOCK was developed, culminating in a new pragmatic trial, 40 winks.

  • Virtual

    Pediatric Grand Rounds

    Show Details

    December 11, 2020

     

    Speakers :

     

    Christine Barron, MD

    Division Director, Aubin Child Protection Program

    Amy Goldberg, MD

    Attending Physician, Aubin Child Protection Program

    Glenn Tung, MD

    Professor of Diagnostic Imaging, Brown University

     

    Topic:

    Abusive Head Trauma in 2020: what’s the controversy?”

     

    Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, participants should be able to:

    • Explain the importance of language evolution in describing abusive head trauma versus Shaken Baby Syndrome.
    • Utilize standard medical diagnostic processes and procedures to recognize and establish a diagnosis of abuse head trauma.
    • Recognize the necessary multidisciplinary approach and rigorous analytical perspective required to address popular media reports on this topic.
    • Define the role of primary care and subspecialists in recognizing and responding to AHT.
  • Desmond Upton Patton, PhD
    Associate Professor of Social Work; Associate Dean of Curriculum Innovation and Academic Affairs
    Columbia University School of Social Work

    Desmond Upton Patton’s research uses qualitative and computational data collection methods to examine the relationship between youth and gang violence and social media; how and why violence, grief, and identity are expressed on social media; and the real-world impact these expressions have on well-being for low-income youth of color. He studies the ways in which gang-involved youth conceptualize threats on social media, and the extent to which social media shapes and facilitates youth and gang violence.

    The Decoding Disparities Lecture Series

    The Decoding Disparities Lecture Series is sponsored by The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University and the Brown School of Public Health to examine health inequity and to outline steps toward a more equitable and just health care system.

    The series is supported by The Paul Levinger Professorship Pro Tem in the Economics of Health Care. This lecture was established in 1987 to honor the memory of Paul Levinger by a gift from his wife, Ruth N. Levinger, on behalf of the Levinger family. The Levingers’ daughter and son-in-law, Bette Levinger Cohen and John M. Cohen ’59, MD were instrumental in Mrs. Levinger’s decision to make this gift.

    Continuing Medical Education Credit

    This live activity is approved for AMA PRA Category 1 Credit

    Physicians: To be eligible to claim CME credit, please register for this event at cme-learning.brown.edu

  • Virtual

    Carney Conversations: How the brain gets things done

    Location: Zoom Cost: Free
    Show Details

    Join the Carney Institute for Brain Science for a conversation focused on how the brain gets things done, featuring David Badre, professor of cognitive, linguistic and psychological sciences at Brown University. 

    This event will be moderated by Diane Lipscombe, Reliance Dhirubhai Ambani Director of the Carney Institute, and Christopher Moore, associate director of the Carney Institute.

    Badre, a cognitive neuroscientist, discusses the neuroscience of cognitive control in his new book, On Task , which will be published in November, including the remarkable ways that our brains devise sophisticated actions to achieve our goals.

  • Virtual

    Pediatric Grand Rounds

    Show Details

    December 18, 2020

     

    Speaker:

     

    Jyothi Marbin, MD

    Associate Clinical Professor, Associate Program Director for Recruitment and Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

    University of California, San Francisco

     

    Topic:

    “Bending the Arc Towards Justice: Teaching about Structural Racism in Pediatric GME”

     

    Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, participants should be able to:

    • Define and provide examples of structural racism.
    • Describe how we can use a structural approach to address health disparities
    • Describe 3 ways we can incorporate teaching about structural racism into residency training.